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IAEI Magazine | Author: Michael Callanan
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Michael Callanan

Michael I. Callanan serves on the National Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee. He is director of Safety, Codes and Standards and is principal member of the National Electrical Code Technical Correlating Committee. Callanan also serves on NFPA 70E, NFPA 70B and is chairman, NFPA 79.

Articles

Arc-Flash Protection and the 2002 NEC

Significant number of electricians are being seriously burned and often killed from an accidental electrical flash while working equipment "hot.” Most of these serious accidents can be eliminated or significantly reduced if the electricians wear the proper type of protective clothing.
MAY-JUNE 2002

Integrating NFPA Electrical Codes and Standards

Recently the National Fire Protection Association announced that their board of directors had taken a historic step in voting unanimously to pursue the development of NFPA 5000, NFPA Building Code. What makes this standard different from other building codes is that NFPA 5000 will be the first building code to be developed using the ANSI open consensus process. In making their decision, the board of directors reasoned that this code would round out and complete the NFPA set of codes.
MAY-JUNE 2001

NEC and OSHA: Protecting Workers from Electrical Shock

Perhaps the greatest advancement in worker safety over the past 30 years has been the development and implementation of ground-fault circuit-interrupter (GFCI) protection. Both the National Electrical Code (NEC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have initiated requirements designed to afford a superior level of protection for both employees and the general public who may be exposed to the hazards of electricity. The purpose of this article will be to explore this development as it relates to GFCI protection for temporary wiring as required by Article 305 of the NEC and OSHA’s 1926, Subpart K, Electrical Standards.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2000

What you don’t know about electricity could hurt you and your family…

More than likely, however, in our industry, what we do know about electricity will cause more damage. Although armed with knowledge, we tend to forget the precautions and get caught up in the excitement of electricity.
MAY-JUNE 1999