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IAEI Magazine | Author: Steve Douglas
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Steve Douglas

Steve Douglas is presently the senior technical codes specialist for QPS Evaluation Services. He represents IAEI on Part I and Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. Steve is the vice chair of the CE Code Part I, chair of CE Code Part I subcommittees for Sections 2, 12, and 50, and a member on Sections 40, 60, 64, 68, 76 and Appendix D. In addition, Steve is the chair of the CSA Standards C22.2 No. 273 Cablebus, C22.6 No. 1, Electrical Inspection Code for Existing Residential Occupancies committee, the Chair of the SPE-1000 Task Force, and a member on committees for the Objective Based Industrial Electrical Code, Safety Management Systems, Solar Photovoltaic Modules, Photovoltaic Cable, Fuel Cells, Wind Turbines, Distribution Transformers, Outlet Boxes, and Wiring Fittings Hardware and Positioning Devices

Articles

Why are you an IAEI member?

In my second year as a wiring inspector, I was introduced to IAEI; the year was 1991 and the event was the Canadian Section meeting held in Kingston, Ontario. I was able to meet inspectors from all over Ontario, Canada, and the United States. The training offered by leading experts was second to none, and the social programs for both the delegates and partners were very impressive. My thought was…… WOW, I need to be a part of this! I left the meeting with an idea of what I thought IAEI was. It was not until years later and after being involved in codes and standards development that I got a better appreciation of the important role IAEI plays in the electrical safety infrastructure for both our great nations.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2013

Grouping of Motors on a Single Branch Circuit

What are the criteria for connecting more than one motor on a single branch circuit overcurrent device? To start to answer this question we need to re-visit the Canadian Electrical Code Part I (CE Code) definition of a branch circuit to recognize that a motor branch circuit is the circuit between the final overcurrent device and the motor including the conductor and the motor controller.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2013

Working Space about Electrical Equipment - CE Code

Code users would be interested in the safety objective of the requirement for working space about electrical equipment and the evolution of this requirement. Working space requirements for electrical equipment first appeared as two rules in the first edition of the Canadian Electrical Code Part I (CE Code) dated 1927. Rule 2001 "(a) Adequate clear working space with secure footing shall be provided about all electrical equipment which requires adjustment or examination during operation or while danger of shock is present.” and Rule 7001 (f) "Passageways around such machinery and equipment as generators, transformers and switchboards shall be kept clear of any obstructions and so arranged as to give authorized persons ready access to all parts requiring attention.”
JULY-AUGUST 2013

Residential Load Calculations

Residential load calculations first appeared in the Canadian Electrical Code Part I (CE Code) in the second edition dated 1930. In the 1930 edition, the load calculation rules were in Section 6 Conductors. The calculations were quite different from the present day calculations. For residential installations, the calculations were based on the number of branch circuits being installed instead of the dwelling floor area. In the fourth edition, dated 1939, a demand factor table for lighting load based on the floor area was added. In the sixth edition dated 1953, the Conductor Section including the load calculation requirements were moved to Section 4 Conductors. This calculation format remained until the seventh edition, dated 1958. A new section called Circuit Loading and Demand Factors including the single dwelling load calculations was added as Section 8 to the eighth edition of the CE Code dated 1962.
MAY-JUNE 2013

SPE-1000 0151 — Model Code for the Field Evaluation of Electrical Equipment

The fourth edition of the SPE-1000 Model Code for the Field Evaluation of Electrical Equipment (SPE-1000) is scheduled to be published by June of this year. The SPE-1000 was first published in 1994 providing requirements used by inspection bodies accredited by the Standards Council of Canada when field evaluating unapproved electrical equipment. Used in conjunction with the requirements of the Canadian Electrical Code (CE Code), Part I, the SPE-1000 document provides construction requirements for the equipment being evaluated along with testing criteria, and minimum marking for equipment nameplates, warning and caution notices. The SPE-1000 does not cover the field evaluation of equipment for use in hazardous locations, medical electrical equipment, equipment connected to line voltage in excess of 46 kV, and individual stand-alone components such as conductors, cable, wiring devices, switches, relays, and timers.
MARCH-APRIL 2013

Cablebus

The new standard for cablebus C22.2 No 273 is scheduled for publication by September of this year. This new standard will be the first standard for cablebus in North America. The committee includes the six major cablebus manufacturers in North America, two switchgear manufacturers, CSA, and an IAEI representative.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2013

2013 International President Steve Douglas — IAEI Focuses on 5 Goals for 2013

Incoming International President Steve Douglas has announced five goals for 2013. These undertakings are designed to assist IAEI in taking a giant step forward in membership, in the industry, in technology, in outreach and in establishing real presence in local communities and across the world.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2013

Making Changes to the Canadian Electrical Code

The Canadian Electrical Code consists of five parts. Part I covers the installation and maintenance of electrical equipment, Part II is the safety standards for electrical products, and Part III is for outside wiring. Part IV is the objective-based industrial electrical code, and Part VI, the electrical inspection code for existing residential occupancies. This article will focus on Part I amendments.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2012

Being an IAEI Appointee to a Canadian Electrical Code Subcommittee

Every IAEI member has an opportunity to participate in development of the Canadian Electrical Code (CE Code). A very effective way is through the subcommittees. That is where the work is done and key decisions are made.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2012

Wiring Methods II

Section 4 of the Canadian Electrical Code covering conductors has seen ten revised subrules, eleven new subrules and one new rule for the 2012 CE Code. The most significant change to Section 4 is the addition of new Rule 4-006. Similar to Article 110.14 of the National Electrical Code, Rule 4-006 limits the maximum allowable ampacity of a conductor to be based on the lesser of the temperature rating of the conductor or the maximum termination temperature marked on equipment
MAY-JUNE 2012

Wiring Methods

Section 12 of the Canadian Electrical Code covering Wiring Methods has seen nineteen rule changes and seven new rules for the 2012 CE Code. The first revision is to change the size of the sand cover used for direct buried conductors or cables from 6 mm to screened sand with a maximum particle size of 4.75 mm in Subrule 12-012(4). The reason for the change was to recognise standard sieve sizes detailed in ASTM Standard D 2487.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Solar Photovoltaic Installations

Section 50 of the Canadian Electrical Code covering Solar Photovoltaic Installations has seen dramatic changes in the last year and a half. As a result of this action four new rules have been added, and all but two of the existing rules have changed. Rule numbers in this article are the rule numbers from the 2012 Canadian Electrical Code, and minor editorial changes have been left out.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2011

Electrical Inspection Code for Existing Residences

CSA Standard C22.6 No. 1-11, Electrical Inspection Code for Existing Residential Occupancies,is a new Canadian standard developed to establish a minimum level of safety in existing residential occupancies and was published in February 2011.
MARCH-APRIL 2011

Pools, Tubs, and Spas – Section 68

Between the 2006 Canadian Electrical Code and the new 2009 edition in Section 68 we have six rule changes, one Appendix B change, and one Table change. The intent of this article is to detail these changes along with rationale for the changes.
MAY-JUNE 2009

CE Code, Section 12 Wiring Methods

Between the 2006 and 2009 Canadian Electrical Code, Section 12 Wiring Methods has seen nine rule changes, and two appendix note changes. The intent of this article is to detail these changes along with rationale for the changes.
MARCH-APRIL 2009

Making Changes to the Canadian Electrical Code

The Canadian Electrical Code consists of three parts. Part I covers the installation and maintenance of electrical equipment, Part II is the safety standards for electrical products, and Part III is for outside wiring. This article will focus on Part I amendments.
MARCH-APRIL 2005

Being an IAEI Appointee to a Canadian Electrical Code Subcommittee

How may times have you said to yourself? "I don’t understand why that rule reads the way it does. It doesn’t take ________ into account. I think I could have done a better job.” Every IAEI member has an opportunity to participate in development of the Canadian Electrical Code (CE Code). A very effective way is through the subcommittees. That is where the work is done and key decisions are made.
MARCH-APRIL 2005