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Does UL List the spiralshaped compact fluorescent lamps (e.g. light bulbs)?

Posted By Underwriters Laboratories, Tuesday, May 01, 2007
Updated: Sunday, February 10, 2013

Question: Spiralshaped compact fluorescent lamp

Does UL List the spiralshaped compact fluorescent lamps (e.g. light bulbs)? Can they be used in any type of light fixture including recessed-type incandescent fixtures?

Answer

UL does List the spiral shaped types of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that are very popular right now. These types of lamps consist of a self-contained fluorescent tube and ballast in an enclosure with a medium base screw shell adapter that will screw into any medium base lamp holder. This category also covers self-ballasted lamps employing light emitting diode (LED) lights. These products are Listed under the product category Lamps, Self-Ballasted and Lamp
Adapters, (OOLR) located on page 169 of the 2006 UL White Book or online atwww.ul.com/databaseand entering OOLR in the Category Code Search.

This category covers fluorescent self-ballasted lamps that incorporate a non-replaceable light source and lamp adapters for use with a replaceable light source, for installation in Edison base lamp holders in incandescent luminaires and portable lamps operating at 120 V 60 Hz nominal.

This category also covers selfballasted lamps and lamp adapters intended for installation in other ANSI base type lamp holders for operation on other voltages as marked on the product.

Products with fluorescent lamps in this category are provided with integral protection that prevents overheating and which meets the requirements of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. for Class P fluorescent lamp ballasts.

Products are marked to indicate the environmental conditions for which they have been evaluated: dry, damp or wet locations.

Unless evaluated for use in totally enclosed recessed luminaires or for use with a dimmer, these products are required to be marked "Not for use in totally enclosed recessed fixtures,” and "Not for use with dimmers.”

The wattage rating on compact fluorescent lamps is typically much less than the incandescent lamp they are replacing. A compact fluorescent lamp rated 13 watts emits the equivalent light output of a 60-watt incandescent lamp and a 42-watt compact fluorescent has the equivalent output of a 150-watt incandescent lamp with a fraction of the heat that is generated from the incandescent lamps.

As long as the wattage on the compact fluorescent lamp is equal to or less than the relamping marking on the luminaire that the lamp is going into, then the compact fluorescent lamp can be used in the luminaire, provided all the markings on the compact fluorescent lamp are complied with. Compact fluorescent lamps run much cooler than incandescent lamps and do not present a heat issue with recessed luminaires.

These products are not intended for use in emergency lighting equipment or exit fixtures.

Tags:  May-June 2007  UL Question Corner 

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